Tag Archives: iot

IoT Hall-of-Shame Facebook Page

Greetings and Happy New Year. It’s early in the month and we’ve already had our first reported IoT Hall-of-Shame entry, as you know if you follow that page or my twitter @codecurmudgeon. For those who live inside Facebook I’ve decided to make your life easier by adding a Facebook page for the Internet-of-Things IoT Hall-of-Shame as well. That way you can just follow it and it will show up in your Facebook feed.

“Things” are being hacked at a furious pace – some even call it the “Internet of Evil Things”. It’s amazing how often I find out about a new hack every single day. Is your TV going to spy on you? Is it easy to hack your phone? Is the stoplight on your corner vulnerable? Keep up to date on what’s happening.

Go check it out, like the page, follow it for the latest IoT Hall-of-Shame updates, and tell your friends. And when you hear about any IoT devices getting hacked please let me know!

Software Safety Keynote EuroSPI 2016

I was honored this week to have the opportunity to present a keynote session at EuroSPI 2016. The title of my presentation was “Software Safety and Security Through Standards” and I discussed one of my favorite soapboxes. That is the idea that software development is often less disciplined than it should be, but it doesn’t have to be. We can and should develop software as an engineering discipline.

One of the key ways to start down this path is to implement coding standards properly. Too many are trying to use coding standards late in the process as a way to find bugs, rather than a way to flag improper methods of coding early on. While the former is cool, the latter is far more valuable.

The adage that “you can’t test quality in a product” is well known, but for some reason in software we think that you can indeed test quality into an application. The same goes for application security, perhaps even doubly so.

In order to break out of the current cycle of code, deploy, fix, redeploy we have to start doing things differently. We have to build a more mature software development process and static code analysis is the way to build upon the body of knowledge and best practices available.

Slides are below. Let me know if you have comments, questions, suggestions. And thanks to everyone at EuroSPI and ASQ for putting on a great conference and allowing me to participate. These are great organizations to get involved with if you’re serious about software quality. I encourage you to check them out.

Software Cybersecurity Podcast

My friend Kevin Greene is devoted to improving the state of software security in the United States and he’s passionate about it. Kevin now has a regular podcast at FedScoop on cybersecurity insights and perspectives and it’s well worth listening to.

Choose Software Security

We recently got together and chatted about the state of cybersecurity today. In particular we talked about the “Internet of Things” (IoT) and my IoT Hall-of-Shame as well as static analysis in general. Kevin was instrumental in getting the Software Assurance Marketplace (SWAMP) setup and funded and we talked about our participation there as well.

‚ÄúProbably if we did a really great job [with software security], the rest of cybersecurity would be a whole lot easier.”

So have some fun and learn something useful about software security at the same time. Here’s where you can listen: FedScoop Cybersecurity Insights & Perspectives. If you have other topics you’d like to cover, let he and I know in the comments or on Twitter.

For more security info check out the security resources page and a few of these books can help.
Embedded Systems Security: Practical Methods for Safe and Secure Software and Systems Development,

Platform Embedded Security Technology Revealed: Safeguarding the Future of Computing with Intel Embedded Security and Management Engine,

Software Test Attacks to Break Mobile and Embedded Devices (Chapman & Hall/CRC Innovations in Software Engineering and Software Development Series)

AutoSec Automotive CyberSecurity

parasoft car small
Last week with Alan Zeichick and I did a webinar for Parasoft on automotive cybersecurity. Now Alan thinks that cybersecurity is an odd term, especially as it applies to automotive and I mostly agree with him. But appsec is also pretty poorly fitted to automotive so maybe we should be calling it AutoSec. Feel free to chime-in using the comments below or on twitter.

I guess the point is that as cars get more complicated and get more “smart” parts and get more connected (The connected car) as part of the “internet of things”, you will start to see more and more automotive security breaches occurring. From taking over the car to stealing data to triggering airbags we’ve already had several high-profile incidents which you can see in my IoT Hall-of-Shame.

To help out we’ve put together a high-level overview of a 7-point plan to get you started. In the near future we’ll be diving into detail on each of these topics, including how standards can help you not only get quality but safety and security, the role of black-box, pen-test, and DAST as well as how to get ahead of the curve and harden your vehicle software using static code analysis (SAST) and hybrid testing (IAST).

The webinar was recorded for your convenience, so be sure and check it out. If you have automotive software topics that are near and dear to your heart, but sure to let me know in the comments or on Twitter or Facebook.

In the meantime, for more security info check out the security resources page and a few of these books can help.
Embedded Systems Security: Practical Methods for Safe and Secure Software and Systems Development,

Platform Embedded Security Technology Revealed: Safeguarding the Future of Computing with Intel Embedded Security and Management Engine,

Software Test Attacks to Break Mobile and Embedded Devices (Chapman & Hall/CRC Innovations in Software Engineering and Software Development Series)