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Phishing Alert – Secret Army Gold

Two phun phishing emails in two days. Both from the same domain, nac.net, which you might want to add to your block list. Yesterday is was a fake FBI email, today it’s the Army.

This is another that falls into the ridiculous category, and maybe the get-rich-quick category as well. How come this army general decided to include me in his $26,000,000.00 windfall of “secret army gold”? (Sound like Three Kings anyone?) And if he really trusts me, why doesn’t he know my name? That alone should be enough reason to ignore such emails automatically.

phishing-army

In review, here’s a few of the things that are wrong with this email:

  • The “From:” email address clearly is not the any valid domain, either military or normal social channels. In fact, it’s known for phishing scams.
  • addressed to “Friend” – He trust me with millions, but doesn’t know my name
  • Random people don’t send you email offering you millions of dollars – not happening
  • Official email address at the bottom doesn’t match the from address. Everything on the left side of the @ sign is the same, but the domain is nac.net at the top, and outlook.com at the bottom. Normal people don’t usually send email like that, with obvious reasonable exceptions.
  • Why is the story a plot from a 90s movie?

FYI nac.net is registered through Godaddy.com since 1995 to a US company called “Net Access Corporation”, so I’m wondering are they purveyors of scams, or just a crappy email provider? Registrant is in New Jersey, server is in Colorado, and domain name redirects to cologix, so who knows.

Stay on the alert – best not to click anything in emails from unknown senders, and anyone who really has millions of dollars for you will figure out how to reach you. That kind of money makes it easy to find out.

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